Fan Girl Dating Data

Swap ‘Why is this happening to me?’ to ‘What is this trying to teach me?’. It will change everything.
— Jay Shetty
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I have been a busy fangirl. I ‘bumped’ into Jay Shetty on my way back to my desk after lunch at work. You can google him now. I have been following Jay for a few years, and his content is inspirational but what I find quite remarkable is his ethos about stepping outside of your comfort zone and perspective.

Over the last few weeks, I have been attending events and having naughty post-event blowouts. The calories gained will be burned off when I start training for the Royal Parks Half Marathon that I am running for the Taylor Bennett Foundation.

I headed to Twickenham for the Employee and Engagement Conference London. There were some recurring themes throughout the day as the award winners presented their campaigns.

 

•    Use of data and insight to inform internal communication and employee engagement strategy.    

•    Diversity and inclusion initiatives, “should quotas be removed?”   

•    Solving the mental health crisis.   

•    Breaking the Myth: “Do Employees Leave Managers, not Companies.”  

•    Implementing Workplace by Facebook. Barriers for adoption and the success stories UNICEF and lastminute.com. 

•    Reinventing recognition schemes in the public sectors with limited budgets.

Ade Cheatham  - CEO - Cooper Parry

Ade Cheatham - CEO - Cooper Parry

There were a few presentations that stood out from Ryan from Hive and Kate from Beyond.

Ryan Tahmassebi, Head of Delivery, Hive HR    

•    How to use survey tools to manage change and create effective questions for engagement.    

•    Overcoming cultural challenges when embedding new HR technologies.  

•    Moving from annual surveys to ongoing feedback for a more meaningful employee experience.   

Businesses have now realised that the more they spend on development and employee experience the better the customer experience will be.   

Why aren't we getting employee engagement right? We seem to be missing critical insights provided by data. Some businesses are now trailing a metric that focuses on ‘Are you having a good day?’ This is a measure of physical and emotional energy.   

Could the solution be adopting an integrated approach for employee engagement that looks at   

•    Meaningful Work     

•    Great Management    

•    Fantastic Environment   

•    Growth Opportunity   

•    Trust in Leadership   

  Based on Bersin by Deloitte Engagement Model

 

Some of the key considerations when implementing an employee engagement campaign  

•    The employee life cycle.   

•    How data is used to craft a narrative to justify the organisations' objectives.   

•    The truth behind response rates and whether the data can be trusted if incentives are attached.   

•    An understanding of the current organisational culture and subcultures. Because introducing new technology doesn’t change a culture.   

•    Real thought and time to test new initiatives.  

    

Kate Rand – People Director, Beyond  

Thinking differently about our people, diversity and inclusion initiatives, agile evangelist and total wellness. A great example of cross-agency collaboration through Flipside which tackles socio-economic diversity. 

  

I went to my first Sharing Social London Event at Runway East. The theme of the meet-up was audience intelligence - what is it and what can you achieve with it. Having data and insight about audiences is something that is becoming more important as the competition for attention gets tougher.

How then does a brand or organisation extract value from existing data and make that a base for their strategy? The two speakers shared best practice and tips on how to get started. 

Emily McReynolds, Passion Digital - How can social analysis be used to inform decisions?

Key Takeaways

 

·       Start with what you have. Social listening, brand sentiment, existing audience intelligence, historical data and trends analysis, competitor data, and previous campaign data.

 ·       Develop questions that guide your data analysis and don’t look for the answers that you want.

·       Insights can inform more than messaging and tone of voice. Effective use can also help with making decisions on media spend, product and service opportunities.

Ben Davies, Media Chain

Ben Davies, Media Chain

 

Ben Davies, Media Chain - Gaming The System: An exploration into the world of gaming and social media. His talk was based on the report Gaming the system? An exploration into the world of gaming and social media

 

Key Takeaways

·       Create a map of what insights and data you are looking for, i.e. Demographics, lifestyle, spending power, social habits, media consumption patterns, and interests.  

·       Brands should build and enhance experiences instead of invading spaces. An example of a brand that has already done some great work in this area is Mercedes-Benz.   

·       The key is value, content and community.

Check out Media Chain’s research and insight reports into Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2018 partnership opportunities and Navigating the next generation fan: How football is social. I will be keeping an eye on their work as we gear up for the Rugby World Cup in September.

 

I've been reviewing themes and examples from the recent Adobe Experience Festival. The Always On, Always Personal, Always Relevant session by Matthew Harwood, Head of Digital Solutions, Royal Bank of Scotland was a snapshot into how RBS transformed the way they think about their business. It is not only about technology and data, but people & process have also been essential to their success.

·       More timely, more relevant and a better understanding of the customers has better results.

·       Spend as much time as possible with frontline staff, and build a closed-loop of feedback.

·       Bring the customer experience to life. In banking, a customer connects with buying a home rather than the process of acquiring a mortgage.

·       As channels change and your strategy evolve there is a need for the ecosystem to grow too.

Check out Data and research in PR by Claire Simpson as it’s a great place to start.

Dancing and Finding Joy

In my imagination, Viola Davis is my ‘auntie’, but my family are concealing this information from me. I am going to borrow a pearl of wisdom from her to briefly explain my take on a piece of not so breaking news that came out recently. While accepting her Emmy in 2015 for outstanding actress in a drama series for her portrayal as professor Annalise Keating on “How to Get Away with Murder, she said, “The only thing that separates women of colour from anyone else is opportunity. You can not win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there." I mention this in the week when Twitter is awash with claims of Beyonce refusing to work with Reebok because of their lack of diversity, and the CIPR State of the Profession is published — showing that our industry is becoming less diverse and failing to protect the mental health of its professionals.

If diversity is being invited to the party and inclusion is being allowed to dance, then who is the DJ playing the music or the bouncer at the door enforcing the 'guest list' with the VIP’s who have the proverbial red carpet rolled out and the velvet rope raised for them. Some days I feel like this industry is one long evening of a silent disco. If you have never been to one, it is a fun but unusual experience. We are all wearing our various headphones each tuned to a different channel. On the dance floor we patiently wait for the DJ to work his magic, but sadly he may not switch on the music for everyone so they simply can’t dance. Because as my wise ‘aunt’ mentioned if the opportunities aren’t being offered then how do we ensure that we have true inclusion. If you don’t give me the chance to lead the teams, speak at conferences on communications and public relation principles, design campaigns and advance to positions that hold real power and influence then how do you expect me to win the awards or sing the melody of inclusiveness.

Comms over coffee

Ella Minty shared, Fixing the Flawed Approach to Diversity by BCG, which unpicks the defects of diversity and inclusion initiatives. Nodding to advancement and retention as a gap for inclusivity of BAME talent gives what Viola mentioned weight. Hiring diverse talent to fill quotas and then failing to nurture talent to move further in their careers to reach their full potential is similar to an employer and our industry selling us the artistic impressions, but choosing not to build the house year after year but keep referring to the plans.

So, I am at the party, and I am going to dance because the DJ is giving me a song to dance to and Polly Cziok has promised to bring the cocktails.

A full list of different blogs and articles analysing the report can be found here.

Now on to more joyous matters. This week I attended an evening with Bruce Daisley, EMEA Vice President of Twitter, author of best-selling book The Joy of Work and the host of the podcast Eat Sleep Work Repeat. I highly recommend the podcast for anyone interested in internal communications.

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Bruce explored many things that I will go into further in future posts as I study more and dive into the book. I am going to outline some of my key takeaways from the evening and what I am changing.

  • We need to future proof ourselves by upskilling in the areas of inventiveness and creativity.

  • The hustle culture as it’s popularly known which glorifies working dangerously long hours is contour productive to creativity.

  • Positive Affect and Psychological Safety have the most significant impact on workplace culture.

  • For an internal communications professional there is a danger of trying to implement quick fixes. At times organisations can create the ‘Smoothie delusion’ that tries to put everyone in a good mood, through improving the benefits that have a one time impact but they do little to transform the state of mind.

  • As Bruce explained, “There are no simple hacks to resolve these things, you need to think about a system to resolve these things to try and build a state of positive affect using far more strategic long term approaches.”

  • Psychological safety doesn’t scale. Amy Edmondson which Bruce references to said, “For fear of appearing ignorant we don’t ask questions, for fear of appearing obstructive we don’t raise objections, we are at a state of managing the impression.”

  • Systems of fear kill our capacity to be creative. But even more, concerning is how fear and stress linger in the air like a bad hangover.

What I am changing:

  • Turning off my notifications

  • Taking a lunch break away from my desk as much as possible

  • Have more face to face interactions

  • Foster an atmosphere of collaboration

  • Develop techniques to improve my energy efficiency

Find an extract of the book on the podcast and I will share my thoughts soon. If you can’t wait listen to Sally’s take on the podcast #CU on the air.

Awww you Don’t Know What AI is?


 

 

Has anyone else seen the MacDonald’s advert? You know the one, where all someone needs is an answer to the question, What is a flat white?

Well, I am every person in that ad and at the end of my version is Kerry Sheehan who kindly answers my conundrum, what does AI mean for Public Relations and Communications professions? I ran to her with all my questions about artificial intelligence.



Now I have been around AI for a while, but I naively thought that I was secure because the robots aren’t writing the press releases yet or designing the agenda for the employee engagement events, so why care. But I too had to confront the existence that we now live and work in. In my day job I am surrounded by smart people who are well plugged into their niches and fields of expertise, so after our Women’s Day breakfast, a conversation started about how AI  has become a stumbling block for women when applying to specific companies. The data that has been inputted is biased. The example of Amazon who had to scrap their AI recruiting tool as it showed bias against women. A colleague has since shared with me how AI is being used in the legal profession and examples from my world internal communications. Although there are already examples such as Attuned in Japan, Xexec, Yva, Trustsphere and Kronos. On further exploration, I discovered work being done by start-ups such as Fuel 50 and Gloat which will most definitely be taking me down a hole of learning. I want understand how AI can help us with employee engagement?  How are companies such as Microsoft already using AI to boost employee engagement? Find resources for Microsoft employee engagement summit 2018 here.  

I’m increasingly inclined to think that there should be some regulatory oversight, maybe at the national and international level, just to make sure that we don’t do something very foolish. I mean with artificial intelligence we’re summoning the demon.
— Elon Musk warned at MIT’s AeroAstro Centennial Symposium

It isn’t, however, all doom and gloom, I came to the realisation that AI in a way has been my saving grace. I am dyslexic and so 12 years ago when I started out as a young journalist, I struggled immensely and had to take a break from the media because of it. Today I have tools such as Grammarly which were non-existent. I have something that can help me develop my writing skills and gave me the confidence to come back into the industry five years ago. I'm now writing again, am working in the profession I love.  

So what can one do to equip themselves for the ever-changing world? I remember being at Best and scanning through piles of nationals and dailies to clip the stories that would make great features of the magazine or going through look books every season, that now is a thing of the past. We all now have the freedom in my communications role to focus on mapping out change and developing new creative ways to communicate.

I want to share Kerry’s advice to me from our conversation which I hope helps anyone who is sometimes overwhelmed by all the new changes like me.

 

Start reading and learning about it. What is try AI and what is automation?

  • Understand what skills are in danger and where you need to equip yourself. The CIPR AI committee has produced a skills wheel, #AIinPR in 5 years, it is a concise and clear breakdown of where we are a profession. Where are we using AI now and how do we ensure we get the most out of it. Some ideas that come to mind are media monitoring, sentiment analysis, personalisation and audience segmentation.

Image courtesy of CIPR #AIinPR

Image courtesy of CIPR #AIinPR

 

 

This week has been very exciting as the Institute of Internal Communications celebrated its 70th birthday. I headed to the London region launch event.  It was great to meet other Internal comms professionals and talk about our profession. Check our Rachel Dakin, IOIC London Director’s Video with Shootsta.

 

IOIC 70th Comms Over Coffee

Keep your eyes peeled for Part 3 of Broke Girls Guide to Professional Development in Communications, there are a few surprises planned. You can read part One and Two  here, and the unexpected post Broke Girl’s Pleas to Conference Producers .

Please head over to the CIPR AI which has  some excellent resources to help you start laying the foundations and deepen your understanding of AI and automation. I recommend this week’s episode of The Internal Comms Podcast with Katie Macaulay and her guest Stephen Waddington aka @wadds.

This week has been a bit of a blur, but I did manage to listen to the astounding Dave Trott on beating creative blindness, (live from IAB Leadership Summit) on Bruce Daisley’s very insightful podcast Eat Sleep Work Repeat. I'm looking forward to The Joy of Work: An evening with Bruce Daisley, EMEA Vice President of Twitter hosted by the IOIC on 5th April. Sally Northeast shares her learning from the book in the latest episode of of #CU on The Air podcast, listen here

Please do let me know your thoughts and experiences with AI in Comms, PR, Marketing, and  Advertising as I want to learn and share experiences.

Broke Girls Pleas to Conference Producers

I like nice things. I adore my Frank and Green coffee cups, yes, I have more than one, I need choices as I do my bit to save the ocean. I love my Aldo boot collection because it’s the only shoe shop that seems to have stylish footwear that fit me and I cherish my Marks & Spencer granola slices. As much as these things make me sound like a snob, these small luxuries all fall neatly into a modest budget, that my salary bracket can accommodate.

What does, however, make my eyes water is the cost of industry conferences. I am very passionate about professional learning and development. I think that communications and Public Relations pros should be given the opportunity to network, share ideas and develop authentic in-person relationships. Recently I wrote two blog posts, with the title ‘Broke Girls Guide to Professional Development in Communications’ and as I begin thinking about part 3, I am struggling to suggest conferences, because of their cost. There is an undercurrent of rumblings which is calling our industry to do better in many areas, but it is time our professional bodies and the influential voices began to holding organisers to account, on the cost, content and location of events.


While I understand that on this subject I speak from a place of privilege because I now work for a company that has a rather forward-thinking view on learning and development. I believe that I would not have this job if I hadn’t been given professional development opportunities. That is why I care about how much things cost and content. Why throw the ladder down at those coming up behind you, when you have climbed to the next level, a nugget I got from Dr Rosena Allin-Khan at the Marie Claire’s Future Shapers event 2018.

The glaring lack of young voice on conference line-ups is worrying. As we fix our crowns and halos with our International Women’s Day glow still fresh, can we address our industries failure to do anything that celebrated or acknowledged the outstanding young women in our space? While I respect the graft of those who have gone before me and sit at their feet, we need more peer to peer support and a space that encourages this. Apprentices, communications assistants and junior executives of all genders, races and backgrounds need to be able to see themselves and know it is possible. Are we an industry that celebrates them now, or only after 20 years in.

Comms Unplugged Marquees by Night - Courtesy of Comms Unplugged

Comms Unplugged Marquees by Night - Courtesy of Comms Unplugged

An example of this is at last year’s Granicus Summit in London, the outstanding Connie Osborne presented Crisis Comms - Managing Manchester's Darkest Hour. It’s a testament to the leadership of Amanda Coleman, the Head of Corporate Communications at Manchester police who is one of the most respected people in public relations, and it is clear to see why she encourages younger people in her team to shine. Please note that when I say young, I don’t merely mean in age, I also refer to industry experience or role. I am only a year into specialising in internal communications, but I too have something to add to the discussion, an award shortlist in my first year. Which is why I am grateful for platforms such as the Institute of Internal Communication’s FutureNet initiative. Comms Unplugged is a pioneering event that is extremely well run and has all the elements of what makes a conference great. As someone shared in the Comms Unplugged what’s app group recently, “Give me a pizza and a night in a tent for a fraction of the price over a gala dinner and a night in the Hilton any day”. The popularity of the Comms Hive dinners being organised by Advitia, the Chair of CIPR Insider is evident that we need inclusive alternatives. It was cheaper for me last year to see Bruno Mars in VIP, Ed Sheeran at Wembley and Kevin Hart in San Francisco combined than one ticket to many industry events. It put the guilt I have about living my youth into perspective.

In case you missed the news, on the other side of the aisle, our counterparts in the public sector are grappling with austerity. High conference fees are unjustifiable when it comes to balancing the budget at the end of the year. As one senior professional in communications shared, it would cost her almost £900 for a day conference and expenses. While many would willingly dip into their own pockets and are, for the benefit of their own careers. What example does this set for future generations, the best events are reserved for the high rollers? I applaud the LGComms Future Leaders Scheme and mentoring programmes such as BME Pros, but places are limited. We need sustainable solutions that can accommodate a wider audience and encompass pros at all levels. While I also argue that not everyone has their sights set on being a director of Communications or being a consultant, opportunities for growth and development should be accessible regardless of their career ambition for their current or future roles.

Throughout my entire career, I have been lucky enough to find a way to network and interact with people who have influence and have the power to make a difference. From Terri White, Hugh Muir, Sam Baker, to the wonderful men and women I have informal mentoring relationships with today. But a lot of these relationships were formed because I was in the right place at the right time. A room I paid to be in, at times.

We are an industry that is rewarded to craft narratives, but what story are we telling about ourselves when our flagship events fail to reflect the vibrant, inclusive industry we wish to see.

In the Arena

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat
— Theodore Roosevelt


I first heard Theodore Roosevelt's arena speech as it is referred to on Tim Ferris Podcast in his audacious interview with the scariest Navy seal imaginable, Jocko Willink. At the time and until now I always thought of it as something to read when someone who knows not of my struggles passes criticism without providing a tangible solution or adding value.  I was reminded of the quote this week when I read Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown. Although it had on my reading list for a while, I think I was avoiding it because it unearths my complex personal struggle with vulnerability, shame and disengagement. But if I'm going to be a better communicator and leader, then I have to be able to work on the things that lead me to hide away from having difficult conversations and confronting ugly truths and deal with vulnerabilities self-imposed or others. So thanks Advita for reminding me of it.

But thinking of the arena speech takes me back to all the conversations that can be summed up in our constant conflict as communicators, “Everyone thinks they can do comms.” Yes, everyone standing on the side-lines assumes that what we do is write a tweet or two, print a few posters and churn out the press releases. But I wonder whether they see the blood sweat and tears behind the scenes. So let's all give each other in the arena a pat on the back and embrace vulnerability. But let’s also make sure we aren’t a critic too judging ourselves harshly and holds on to toxic perfectionism.

 

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I went to FutureNet’s Trailblazer event to get some insights into the fantastic triple awarding winning employee engagement campaign, Trailblazers by Kerry Foods. Jacqueline Ryan, Internal Communications and Employee Engagement Advisor at Kerry Foods, and FutureNet committee member shared great insights and here are my five key takeaways.

  • Employee engagement which is leader led has to be precisely that. People need to see and hear leadership at every stage in an authentic way. 

  • Be flexible and allow the campaign to flow. Sometimes the best-laid plans change, and that is fine.

  • Let the stories shine through.

  • User-generated content is the future as budgets gets tighter and communicating with hard to reach audiences becomes harder.

  • Recognise people for their courage and desire to take part. These are the things that cost nothing but mean so much to people and should be at the heart of the business values.

 

I managed to catch up with Jess, The Voracious Nomad who put me on the spot slightly and interviewed me for her podcast. We talked about professional development, storytelling, black tax and the future.  Doing this interview was entirely out of my comfort zone, and I usually would have said no but over the last year I have been saying yes more thanks to Shonda Rhimes. Listen to it here

 

Resources mentioned in the episode:

Who will be my Ellen?

Year of Yes- Shonda Rhimes

Born a Crime, Stories from a South African Childhood – Trevor Noah

Slay In Your Lane - Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené

Legacy – James Kerr

AllThingsIC

Comms2point0

The IC space

Alive with Ideas

Comms Unplugged  

#CommsChat

Power and Influence by Ella Minty

The Internal Comms Podcast with Katie Macaulay

To an Unexpected Epic January

With the way January is going, I wish I had made resolutions. Instead, I was busy dancing in my PJ’s singing, Thank you, next. So I’m taking a moment to catch my breath, soak it all in and appreciate it all over a cappuccino.

I had the incredible pleasure of sitting in Rachel Miller, All Things IC hot seat. I met Rachel last year when she delivered an internal communications masterclass at a Partnership event.  Not only did she unleash an internal communications monster, but she also became a mentor, guiding me through the highs and lows. Rachel is very supportive, kind, encouraging, and honest.  The All Things IC blog is rich with knowledge and information I would recommend visiting it.

Last year while in Birmingham for the Public Sector Communications Academy over a glass of wine, because the best things happen over a glass of something. Darren Caveney, Carly and I had a chat about the role of business partner in communications teams, account management and working with agencies. That conservation evolved into something tangible because Darren makes things happen. He contacted the fantastic agency One Black Bear, and a day trip was born. Darren wrote an informative blog post on his site Comms2Point0, “be fierce and never mediocre – 28 lessons from a top creative agency”. Head over there and check out the other great resources.

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And then we come to this week, and the Employee and Engagement Awards. We lost of Ministry of Justice and I would like to congratulate them. I can’t wait to read their submission. That brings me to this post which is our submission. This campaign took a lot of trust because it was something different and it was a step forward in using Internal Communications to solve business problems at zero cost.

“Be Epic” Campaign

In May 2018, Merton Council’s communications team conceived a highly successful internal communications campaign to help the overstretched IT department build staff engagement towards its live, but largely unadopted, IT Password Reset system.

Low enrolment levels meant that password resets continued to be one of the top requests to the IT Service Desk, which was already receiving approximately 1800 calls per month.

The “Be Epic” campaign transformed staff engagement, accelerating enrolment levels by 214% at no cost. It further freed up valuable IT resource and changed internal perceptions of the powerful impact communication can have upon behavioural change.

Evaluation of ‘Be Epic’ Christmas campaign, shows a 580% increase in staff using the self-service portal to reset passwords and unlock accounts compared to same period in 2018. There was a 65% decline in calls to the IT service desk requesting password resets, 70% of staff are now enrolled.

  

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The Merton Council “Be Epic” Campaign ran for three months between 30 May and 30 August 2018 then at the festive period from Mid December 2018 to end of January 2019. This was a creative internal communication campaign which successfully addressed a critical IT challenge for the council, i.e. to persuade staff to enroll to the Password Reset Self Service system, a live but largely unadopted system which allows staff to reset their passwords across the Merton Network.

The campaign, therefore, set out to accelerate staff enrolment and reduce the number of staff calling the help desk for password resets, a regular Service Desk request which tied up valuable IT resource which could be more efficiently deployed elsewhere.

The Communications strategy took an inclusive approach to the challenge, by borrowing the highly engaging “Feel Epic” equity from a recent and very well known “Money Supermarket” advertising campaign.

The campaign used bright, eye-catching visuals, referencing the summer by deploying many fun “ice lolly” characters which invited staff to “be Epic” through signing up for the Password Reset service and sharing their positive experience of the process. This clear call to action and the light, non-corporate, tone were identified as crucial elements for some staff in helping to remove the fear-factor around adopting a new IT process.

The campaign’s creative use of all the key internal media channels (intranet, staff bulletin, email, posters and lift screens) guaranteed high visibility to all employees.

Crucially, the campaign ensured that employee engagement was built into its very design. The messaging was regularly refreshed as enrolment numbers increased to create a peer influence effect in the countdown to the enrolment deadline of 31 August.

In the early stages, the campaign effectively targeted the early adopters amongst staff, using light messaging which drove awareness around the option to enroll. As the campaign developed, our messaging successfully referenced team dynamics to target more resistant staff cohorts.

Updating the campaign with the latest enrolment numbers created a peer influence effect which encouraged staff to either bring their colleagues on board, or to join their colleagues who had successfully done so already: “So now I’ve got to get down with the epic kids too?”.


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The characters were carefully curated taking into consideration the age, ethnic and class difference. The messaging was made relatable to different groups with a clear understanding of what their interests are.

 The tone of the campaign also held broad organisational appeal, referencing topical events such as the heat wave, upcoming summer holidays and the World Cup.


A strong partnership with the IT department played a vital role too. Their system access allowed them to keep the creative work up-to-date with the latest updates on enrolment numbers, and to target individuals who had not yet enrolled with a direct email entitled “Do you want to feel epic?”.

This campaign approach was highly successful. On the first day of the “Be Epic” launch, the IT department recorded a dramatic increase in system engagement, with six enrolments in the first six minutes.

The “Be Epic” campaign, as referenced earlier, was inclusive by virtue of its design. The campaign included a clear call to action: “Share your story about your password reset experience here”. 

Staff were delighted to share positive testimonials which could then be incorporated as social proof in the later stages of the campaign, their stories proving to be highly relatable and persuasive.

The humorous execution “An Epic fairy tale in Merton” told the story of John, a senior member of staff who had got into a spot of IT trouble:

“Over his morning coffee, using his keep cup, he locked himself out of his Merton account!

He didn’t despair as he had already joined the epic gang and followed all the steps to get a new password…...Now John feels epic!”.

Another execution, entitled “Abby reset her own password, and now she feels epic!” focused on staff empowerment and the benefits of being able to reset your password outside core office hours:

“My token was locked at 6:45 am this morning, and I unlocked it using the password reset service – amazing! I did it in less than 2mins! If I hadn’t been able to do this, I would not have been able to work until 8 am, when the IT Service Desk opens.” 

This creative agility would not have been possible without the commitment of the Internal Communications team to learning the Canva design tool. This allowed them to bring creative skills in-house so that they could design and update the campaign in real time, in collaboration with the IT department, and at no cost to the organisation. Regular meeting with the head of IT service delivery team and helpdesk staff ensured that the campaign solved the bottlenecks identified. For example, staff enrolling before they go on their holidays, as there is a spike in calls after school holidays. It has led by the IT service desk changing their ‘on hold’ message to reflect the self-service options available.

The knock-on effect of this campaign is that it demonstrated the value of peer-peer interaction. This has begun feeding into new internal corporate change campaigns where staff are the face of the message. Staff feel more empowered to share their stories and trust the internal communications channels.  

This simple creative campaign has been shown to have increased cross-departmental collaboration. The communications team were often viewed as the broadcasters of pre-approved messages, with one staff member once asking, "Why do comms have to change everything?" There has been a change in this view following the success of the Epic campaign, with services contacting communications for advice and support to communicate better to their internal and external stakeholders.

This campaign has opened the door and laid the foundations for a new wave of digital marketing and communications, with agreement now in place for new investment in digital communications platforms to improve how we communicate internally and externally. Merton have now full incorporated the use of Sli.do which can provide cherished staff feedback through sessions such as chief executive briefings, and  live webcast question time with corporate management team.

The campaign was highly successful in positively changing staff behaviour by empowering them to reset their own passwords, thus achieving its goals of accelerating staff enrolment and reducing the number of staff calling the help desk for password resets.

 

Measurement

Before the campaign launched, the overstretched IT team typically received 1,800 calls per month, with password resets being one of the Top 10 call types. The IT team estimated that each reset request would usually take 5 minutes, meaning that successful adoption of the new Password Reset system could potentially save up to 150 hours of valuable IT time per month. Despite the IT team’s previous efforts to communicate the benefits of their new system, enrolments had remained low. In one year, they had achieved only 700 enrolments (28% of their user base), and they projected that it would take four years to reach their target.

By the end of the three month long “Feel Epic” campaign, enrolment numbers had increased by 214% to reach 1,402 staff members and this number continues to grow. 70% of the workforce is fully enrolled.  

 Lastly, the campaign has positively changed internal perceptions of the communications team and their value, opening a gateway to more collaborative working partnerships across the organisation.

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