Too Exclusive to Be Inclusive

Winning isn’t everything, but wanting to win is.
— Vince Lombardi

I can almost picture it in my mind. Me in the French Riviera town strolling along in my sundress at the Cannes Lions Festival, maybe that will be my gift to myself next year when I reach a certain age I had all sorts of dreams and hopes for as a child. Better start that saving pot now because it will probably cost me a pretty penny.

So why am I reminiscing about age and the industries most coveted festival, well for the last few weeks I have been trying so hard to behave myself. Do you know what I mean? Not speaking up about the brokenness in our little ecosystem, but our industry doesn’t make it easy so here goes.

 

It is about time we revamped our awards and power lists. Yes, these are vanity metrics and before you remind me that prizes don’t keep the lights on let’s just take a step back and refocus. Earlier this year I realised they actually do. Being shortlisted and winning puts your business and your prospects as an individual to the top of the pile when it comes to winning bids and gaining employment. It is a nod that your work met the objectives of the brief. It serves as an inspiration because it is probably one of the few times when we get a peek at the work our peers are doing and share best practice.

 

 Currently only one of our professional bodies has a comprehensive, inclusive people category that doesn’t have an age requirement for entry. In 2018 the Cannes Lion awards body changed categories’, put a cap on award entries to stop monopoly by the big players and allowed for speakers to self-nominate for the festival. While flaws still exist in the imperfect system maybe it should be considered as a step in the right direction. 

 

Categories are quite broad which means that a small technology agency campaign is being judged against a banking powerhouse. Using data and insight from previous years it would only be right to split across sectors or campaign objectives. As we beat that drum of moving towards being an industry that cares about the world around us and our people maybe it is time we start to highlight this work. In the next 5-10 years, our profession is going to lose an entire generation that paved the way for what we do today. Call me sentimental but in the year that the Institute of internal communications celebrates it’s 70th birthday maybe it is time we started to capture those stories and honour those individuals with awards categories that represent what they stood for. Which is why I was so happy to see the PRCA collaborate with Hotwire for their wonderful #PR60Over60 this week.

 

Then we come to money which we know makes the world go round. In some instances, award submissions cost up to £500 for some categories which excludes the public sector, charities, individual practitioners and small agencies or consultancies. Writing award entries isn't taught at school either, so it takes a certain level of expertise hence why at times this is outsourced at a cost, adding another obstacle of complexity.  I am not even going to go down the road of talking about the price of the award dinners. I leave this gif to explain how I feel about this topic.

  

Maybe there is room for us to rethink what we offer at the ceremonies. Comms2Point0 hosts The Unawards, which is an exciting alternative is a day out at the cinema. What stops other organisers from doing a Cannes style festival during the day and an affordable awards gala in the evening.

I am happy to work with our professional bodies or companies who hold awards in the public relations, communication and internal communications space to find a way to make them more inclusive.